Common face and body rashes in children of Plano

It is common for children to develop rashes on their face or body throughout the years. Mystery rashes are a common concern for parents in the Plano community who have children of any age. This is a typical reason dermatologists see children, and can be easily addressed with a simple examination and diagnosis.

Below are some of the most common rashes on the face and body of children:

Baby Acne

Infants may have acne as soon as they are born or shortly afterwards. These small whiteheads with reddish skin will go away on their own, but can be aggravated by harsh detergents, milk residue on the face, or when hot or upset.

Chickenpox

Many children receive a chickenpox vaccine now, but it can still develop regardless of the vaccination. These red spots are often itchy and they progress to small blisters and can appear all over the body. They are often accompanied by a fever, headache, muscle aches, and nausea.

Cradle Cap

Often seen on the top of a baby’s head, this scalp condition occurs and appears as yellow scaly patches that may flake off like dandruff. Cradle cap can be treated with regular washing of the hair with baby shampoo and a soft brush to loosen flakes as it improves.

Eczema

Eczema can occur on the body and it often is seen as flare-ups. It results in dry, itchy, and red skin that may crack or bleed. This condition often improves as children age, but it may be improved with topical solutions from your dermatologist.

Measles

Measles are rarely seen anymore because of vaccinations, but when they occur, it is often noticed as white spots on the mouth as well as a rash throughout the body. It may be itchy and uncomfortable and this can be addressed with hydrocortisone cream. This virus needs to run its course but should do so in just a few days. It may be accompanied with a fever, cough, red swollen eyes, and a runny nose.

Diaper Rash

Diaper rash, or “nappy rash,” may occur on the bottom and around the genitals due to wearing a diaper that is wet for longer than desired. Diaper rash creams can be used on the area while patients are advised to change any wet diapers as soon as possible, and allow children time outside of their diaper to stay dry and help reduce moisture in the area. Occasionally the rash can become complicated with a secondary yeast infection, which your dermatologist can diagnose and treat for you.

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